Turkey, Kale Delight Soup

Someone just remembered to drop off his Turkeys ‘R’ Us turkey from November, this week. It was actually right on time. We had no meat in the freezer, so this week’s soup is turkey! I looked around for other ingredients. I had bought too much for the salad last Friday. Thankfully, the kale, carrots and radishes kept just fine. This is what I came up with. It may look weird on paper, but it smells and tastes great! I am a great believer in expanding people’s palates. Also, if food is good for us nutritionally, chances are, it will appeal to us, as well. In the couple of decades that I have been cooking, I have only had a few clunkers. All but one or two could be remedied with more hot sauce. However, this is not one of those.

Ingredients:

  • ~ Medium sized turkey (12 to 15#) Roasted, covered, with 2″ of water in pan with celery seeds and basil in the water.
  • 1 pound bag Kale Greens
  • 2 pounds Radishes
  • 2 pounds Carrots
  • 2 Sweet Red Peppers
  • 1 teaspoon fresh frozen Thyme
  • 1 teaspoon fresh frozen Sage
  • 3 inches fresh Ginger
  • 1 Avocado, peeled and cubed (may be underripe)
  • 4 yellow onions
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Cinnamon
  • 1 Tablespoon Paprika

Directions:

Put the turkey (as indicated above) in the 350º oven, and roast until it reaches minimum 170º internal temp. While that is roasting, fill a 22 quart stock pot to about 6 inches with water and start simmering. Chop Thyme, Sage & Ginger in a bullet or Ninja & add to pot. Top & half carrots, then pulse them in Ninja until “soup size”. Add to pot. Do the same for the Radishes, Peppers & Onions, being careful to wash them beforehand, of course. Add the Avocado. Add the Paprika and Cinnamon. Bring to a boil and cook these until tender. Be careful to stir regularly, so nothing scorches. Once everything is tender, turn off heat.
Wash and chop the Kale in a Ninja to “soup size” and add to pot. When the Turkey is done cooking, drain liquid into soup pot, peel back skin and let sit to cool for a bit.
DSC02882This is a good time to set up the soup pot into the canner on top of a couple of rags with water, to form a double boiler. Set it on a burner and start it heating. Don’t let it boil dry, and your soup will never scorch.
Once the turkey is OK to handle, tear it into bite sized pieces to add to the  soup. Let it stew until it is ready to pour into the Igloo cooler to head for the city.
(Igloo is the only brand of plastic cooler that doesn’t leak that doesn’t melt.)

There is no salt in this recipe. I usually do not use salt. We offer a salt grinder, so people can add their own if they wish to.

Kale is naturally bitter. So I chose Ginger and Cinnamon, which are full frontal sweet to counteract that. Paprika is sweeter that Black Pepper. Basil and Sage are on the sweet end of the savories. All in all, it works!

Try it! You’ll like it!

We will be offering it along with a vegetarian alternative, sandwiches, hard-boiled eggs, water, fruit and granola bars to about 100 homeless friends tonight on the streets of Philadelphia. We are facing foreclosure ourselves, but as long as I have a stove to cook on and someone shows up with a turkey …



Martin’s Ground Beef Hash

Thursday, it was unclear whether or not we were going to be able to serve anything in the city on Friday night. I had spent $400 of personal funds to make the TKJ-mobile operational again. Our personal budget was blown for the month. There was not enough money to buy any food and drink for Philadelphia, for the guys on the street. I shared the last post on Facebook with the tagline: “We are out of money and out of food for the street. The car is fixed, out of personal funds, so we are out of money for the month. But I deserve to end up homeless, so don’t send money to help the poor.”

One friend responded with a $100 donation. So I called up Tony and told him to get himself up here to help me cook and gear up for the street. Friday morning, we shopped, then Tony peeled and diced potatoes while I cooked.

Ingredients:

  • 9-1/4 lbs. 80% lean Ground Beef
  • 7 lbs. red potatoes, peeled, diced to ~1/2″ cubes and rinsed
  • 3 lbs. yellow onions, diced
  • 5 large, sweet red peppers, cut into 1″ pieces
  • 1 head Garlic
  • 1-1/2″ fresh Ginger
  • Black Pepper Grinder
  • Ground Red Pepper
  • Paprika
  • Ground Coriander

In the largest cast iron skillet you own, start to fry up a large handful of Ground Beef. Add a diced Onion or two and some of the Sweet Pepper. Add a bunch of the diced potatoes. Grate some ginger onto it. Crush a clove or two of Garlic onto it. Shake some Paprika, Red Pepper and Coriander on. Grind some Black Pepper on. Keep stirring and turning this until all the beef is cooked and the potatoes are looking delicious, but not crispy. Dump into large, agate roaster pan and repeat. Try not to have the skillet so full that you end up with your range full of potatoes and onions at the end of the process (voice of experience). Stir everything together in the turkey roaster pan. Cover. Place in the oven and slow roast for three to five hours at 190º.

Notes: Do not short circuit this recipe by failing to slow roast it. That is the secret to its success! The initial sauteeing released all the flavors, but the slow roasting allowed the subtleties of them to blend throughout the dish.
Coriander adds a very subtle, earthy flavor note. It is more important as a nutrient. It is helpful to the kidneys. Ginger is a bit of a surprise, but subtle in this amount. It plays a bit with the garlic. Only the more sensitive palates will notice, but they will smile.

It’s a low sodium recipe. We let people add their own salt. Very few people did. This is the first time in 30 years we served hash. The guys were enthusiastic! They told us to make it part of our regular rotation. We said we would try. Now we just need to try not to become homeless ourselves, and find some regular support.



Rising From the Ashes

It was an overreaction to state that our doors were closing. The truth is serving meals on the streets of Philadelphia was never intended to be the core of the ministry of The King’s Jubilee. It was just what the inmates at Graterford Prison set for me to do personally as I was starting the ministry. The prophetic ministry that has angered so many people was much more at the core of the ministry, as the goal of TKJ is not just to facilitate almsgiving, but to realize the King’s jubilee as Isaiah described it in his great jubilation song of chapter 61, which Jesus quoted in Luke 4, when he introduced his public ministry, and the ministry of all who would be his true disciples!

So people have gotten upset with me and say I shouldn’t be political and claim that the Gospel isn’t political. Well if the Gospel isn’t political, why were all the people enraged and wanted to stone Jesus? These were the political power brokers of Jerusalem. Yes. They were church people, just as they are today. Yes. they had no time for Jesus rearranging their lives and laying claim to what they mistakenly thought were their riches, just as they don’t today. The sounding of the “Jubal”, from which we even derive the word tuba, signified the Jubilee which meant that all the land and everything in it belonged to YHWH. The Law prescribed a radical redistribution of the land (the most basic capital in an agrarian society), freeing of all slaves, cancelling of all debts, and a rest for the land and for the draft animals.

This was not just for the Jews and to be forgotten. This was the core lesson of the whole Old Testament. The Jews never kept the sabbath years and the Jubilee. For this, they went into captivity. “These things were for our admonition.” Then Jesus quotes Isaiah’s Jubilee proclamation to initiate the new era in Luke 4. The early Christians took this seriously. That’s why they were martyred so regularly and why so much change took place. They went out and gave proper burials to the pagan poor and slaves whose bodies had been thrown on the trash heap, honoring every human being equally. They rescued babies who were left to die because they were the wrong gender or families had too many, and raised them as their own, respecting and having compassion for every life without discrimination no matter the cost. They honored and protected women, as they revered Mary as she who bore Jesus, establishing monogamy and chastity as the standard. Women were apostles and deacons and some say Priscilla was a priest. She is adorned so in an icon in a chapel under the Vatican. They were a mighty army of radical love; an army that died, but never killed. This is what Jesus called us to.

I am still a follower of Jesus. I have been abused by too many clergy to feel comfortable in church. I suffer with CPTSD from non-sexual clergy abuse. I don’t sort out saved and lost. Jesus forbade that, when he said, “Judge not.” and “Judge nothing before the time.” I don’t care if you or I are atheist today or tomorrow or not, or Muslim, or Jew, or Hindi, or any number of religions or philosophies with which I am not familiar. We are all subject to where we fell out of our mother’s wombs on this orb, as to what we believe, what nationality we are, what language is our primary, etc. It’s interesting, but nothing to be judged on. We welcome anyone to serve with us.

You will see on our site and on our literature that we serve in Jesus’ Name. The Hebrew sense of serving in someone’s name was not to be calling out their name all the time or even ever. It was to be serving according to their will and wishes. So what we mean is that we attempt to follow the Golden Rule. We serve people with dignity and respect. We do not look down upon those we are serving or make them feel as if they are anything but equals, brothers and sisters. We never use an institutional approach. Every one is special and unique. There are no cookie cutter solutions.

So, where from here?

We intend to continue to do and develop our services to those transitioning off of the street. We had hoped to not be serving people on the street by this time at any rate, hoping there would be no need. We already have our Clean Start and Kitchen Jumpstart programs that need continued support and participation. We also have our Rent Party program which we will be expanding and promoting as this is a vital need to help folks move off of the street. We will be developing a one on one or posse friendship program to help people make the move off the street. It can be very hard for people. Homelessness is not just the lack of walls in our city. It is its own subculture. People need something to replace that with if they are to succeed. This is where city volunteers come in.

I will be working, finishing my cookbook / nutritional guide for ministries serving the homeless. We have raised the bar over the years nutritionally, and would like to see others follow suit. I want to share this knowledge of the hows and whys and what nots, before they escape from memory.

Please join us in this next phase of The King’s Jubilee. We need your regular monthly support, even if it’s just $10. Use the Donate button below. Thank you. God bless you.




The artwork above is available at 24″x24″ for sale in a custom, handcrafted frame. It is entitled “Phoenix”. Most of my artwork will be on display Father’s Day weekend at Teich & McColgan Daylilies & Hostas, next to Peace Valley Winery. See you there!

Moroccan Style Rice

This is the vegan dish that I mentioned a few posts ago that Miss April made for us to serve on the street, which delighted our South African friend so much. A few of our readers asked for the recipe, so here it is.

Ingredients:

  • 3 or 4 Very large Spanish Onions
  • 12 oz. Apricots – chopped
  • 1 box of raisins
  • 2 bunches fresh Cilantro
  • 2 bunches fresh Parsley
  • 1½ cups Wild Rice
  • 2 lb. Basmati Rice
  • 3 Tablespoons Turmeric
  • 3 teaspoons Cinnamon
  • 2 lb. Carrots – sliced
  • Olive Oil
  • Salt

Cook rice. Chop onion, parsley and cilantro fine in food processor. Sauté with spices in olive oil. Toss everything together in a turkey roasting pan. We slow cooked it at 200º or 250º until it was time to leave for the city. It basically needs to be baked until the carrots soften.

This recipe makes a large turkey roasting pan full.



Turkey Royale

On Thursday, December 18, I was moving pretty slowly. I was so tired from Wednesday. I don’t know if it’s the medications, the pain, the CPTSD, or the kidney disease that makes me so tired and sleepy, but most days it is hard to stay awake for more than two hours in a row. So I planned a fairly simple soup this week; simple to make, that is. It had very interesting and complex flavor notes. We served all of it, yet added very little hot sauce or salt and pepper to it for our customers. Here’s the recipe.

Start by baking an 18 pound turkey in a covered roasting pan with about 3 inches of water in it with about a tablespoon of ground ginger in it. I use an oven with a probe, so I set that to 170º and let it go past it to about 174°.

Once that is halfway done, get your food processor, canner, 22 quart stock pot, old hand towel, and the rest of your ingredients out:

  • 2 quarts homemade Turkey Broth
  • 1-3/4 cups Royal Purple Rice aka Black Rice aka Havasta
  • Olive Oil
  • ~ 4 sticks of Celery
  • 1 pound Carrots
  • 2 Red Onions
  • 2 Yellow Onions
  • 2 Fennel
  • 3 inches Fresh Turmeric
  • 2 inches Fresh Ginger
  • 1 pound Radishes w/o greens
  • 1 oz. fresh Parsley
  • Mixed Peppercorn grinder
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Coriander
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Turmeric
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Star Anise

When the turkey is about halfway done, place the homemade turkey broth in the 22 quart stock pot and begin to heat it up. Mine was frozen. That’s why I said, place. Start the rice. I use a simple rice cooker. Pour in some olive oil. Add the black rice, then a Tablespoon of turmeric, then the appropriate amount of water. It takes a little more water than brown rice.

Throw the Fresh Ginger and Fresh Turmeric into the blender and pulverize it, until they are as fine as you can get them. Cut the carrots into 3 inch lengths and throw them into the blender or Ninja chopper bowl with the ginger and Turmeric. Hit Pulse a few times, until the carrots are all bite size or smaller, but not pureed. Dump into stock pot. It may take a few loads to get all the carrots. Then do the same for the onions, including the parsley with one of the loads. Similarly chop the celery, the fennel, including the feathery tops, and, finally the radishes. Rinse out the blender or Ninja bowl with hot water and ad that to the stock pot. You should be stirring this every time you add something.

When the turkey is done, drain all the liquid into the stock pot and leave the turkey on the counter to cool until you are able to tear it up to put it into the soup. Add the Coriander and the Star Anise and ~ 1 Tablespoon fine ground, mixed Peppercorns. Stir. Get your canner and place your old hand towel, folded in half, in the bottom of it. Put about 2-1/2″ hot tap water into it. Place the stock pot into the canner and move it onto the burner. Now you have a giant double boiler, so as long as there is water in the canner, it is impossible for you to burn the soup. Take a teapot or measuring cup and fill the canner to about 2″ shy of the top for maximum heat transference without it bubbling over. Keep the cover on the stock pot as much as possible.

As soon as the turkey is barely cool enough to handle, rip it up and add it to the soup, stirring it in frequently. On the first dip under, the meat will appear green. After a few more dips, it will appear brown or purple. It is not a pretty soup. It is ideal for serving in the dark. So right around the winter solstice, outdoors, is ideal. It is very tasty! And nutritious. The wild purple royal rice has a lightly sweet flavor. It actually has been known to lower blood sugar in some people. It is so named because it was reserved for royalty in China. The earthy turmeric actually draws out this flavor and is a powerful anti-inflammatory, which improves liver function, can replace Lipitor, fight arthritis, diabetes, and 40 other ailments. Ginger is also a powerful anti-inflammatory with some of the same effects and an added benefit of preventing migraines. Anise and fennel are good for the digestion and the teeth and gums. Coriander is especially good for the kidneys and the bladder. The rice, also known as black rice, has more flavonoids  ounce for ounce than blueberries, so it is great for fighting or preventing cancer. These are all great things for people who have limited access to regular healthcare.

billTedWe realize that one meal in the week is not a solution. We publish these recipes in the hope that we can raise the bar for others serving and, perhaps set the pace. I would hope as we have learned more about diet and health, we have improved our own diets and the way we cook for ourselves. This just comes under the Golden Rule: to do for others as we would have done unto us. Or as Bill and Ted said it: “Be excellent to each other! And party on, Dudes!”

And it was a party. Bethann & I are on the verge of being foreclosed on again. When we went down there, we had nothing in our or TKJ’s bank accounts. The only money in my wallet was committed to help someone else with their rent. We gave away hundreds of sandwiches, 21 quarts of soup that was really stew, a cabbage potato side, spaghetti, loads of hard boiled eggs, oranges, bananas, Girl Scout made cupcakes, ice tea, peanuts in the shell, goodies, underwear, coats, socks, and blankets. We received word from a grinning Grigory that his son was back from the Ukraine alive! He doesn’t have to go back until March. We were rejoicing with tears of joy together. (There are worse places to be than homeless on the streets of Philadelphia.) Rashawn reminded me to buy him a cake for his birthday next week. I told him, No, I will build him one!

I am so thankful for the families that faithfully make sandwiches every week, or once a month. I am so thankful for the people who donate regularly to make what we do possible each week. I am so thankful for all the people who bailed us out this year when we were going to lose our house. I am so grateful for the people who have not given up on me, or at least, have decided not to punish the homeless on my account.

The last two Thursdays, I had people lined up who were coming, who I was pretty much counting on to drive. They clean forgot. I understand that. I have done that with fairly important appointments. These days, I miss an average of one doctor’s appt. per month. I’ve had six strokes and I never used calendars before. Both weeks, we had a driver show up, so, no problem. On Thursday morning, I felt like I didn’t want to go. I was just that tired. I had to finish making a Christmas gift to bring along to deliver, as well. I got kind of a late start to the day. Then the pace picked up, and it was so worth it! For me, it is unthinkable to miss a week going down if I can at all make it. It’s what I was made for! I understand if this is not your cup of tea, yet you are willing to fill in here and there. Not everyone can be crazy like me. I am too stupid to be afraid in just about any situation. I am comfortable around all kinds of people, in all kinds of mental states. But I don’t have the patience to faithfully make loaves of sandwiches for people I don’t even see week after week after week. That is a real gift of hospitality! I don’t have a means of earning the money to support this ministry or the work I do for it. But I enjoy giving your alms away for you.

I’ve rambled long enough. Thank you for supporting the ministry to those of you who do. We need much more if we are to continue to serve with the quality we have grown accustomed to.

Please consider a year end gift and a monthly automatic donation.

Peace.



Ginger-Plum Chicken Breast

Last night I made vegetarian split-pea soup with avocados in it for the fat. So when I went to Giant to see what to make for a casserole, I was thinking I should make something with meat. I found good quality, skinless, boneless, chicken breasts for $1.99/pound. I picked up two trays for a total of just under nine pounds. Then I looked around for what would go with them. I will just write the recipe. It turned out fantastic!

Ingredients:

  • ~9 pounds skinless, boneless, chicken breasts
  • 8 to 10 red plums, (~ 2 pounds)
  • 2-1/4 cups black rice
  • 3 cups quinoa
  • avocado oil
  • 1 Tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • ~ 6 teaspoons & 1 Tablespoon ground ginger
  • medium grind black pepper
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup water

Directions:

Put the quinoa, black rice, a Tablespoon of ginger and some oil in the rice cooker with a little extra water for brown rice and start. When done, dump into turkey roasting pan. Cut the plums in half and pit. Throw them in the blender with a Tablespoon of cinnamon and puree. Add it to the roasting pan. While this is going on, you can be browning batches of chicken breasts. Cut chicken breasts into bite sized pieces. In the largest skillet you own (preferably cast iron) heat up avocado oil and sprinkle a teaspoon of ginger and grate black pepper into it. Add a couple of breasts worth of meat and cook it long enough to sear it, not so long that it is toasted. Add it to the roasting pan and mix in. Keep doing this until all the meat is seasoned. Add the lemon juice and water. Cover and bake of an hour at 350º. After that hour, turn the oven down to 200 to hold until you are ready to go down to the street or your event.

Black rice has more flavanoids per ounce than blueberries and actually helps lower blood sugar. Quinoa is a super food because it is a slow carb and includes protein. Plums have important vitamins and fiber. Ginger is a powerful anti-inflammatory. I use fresh ground, Chinese Cinnamon, which helps control blood sugar. I use fresh ground, black pepper which is a natural germ fighter and anti-oxidant. These are all important considerations for people who live outdoors in the harsh urban environment.



Guava Rice & Plantain Spice

This is a simple and delicious recipe that the people really loved. It is sweet with no added sugar. It looks elegant and smells wonderful! People keep asking me, “Where do you come up with these things!” All I can say is that I have scripts for four different psychoactive drugs, so it’s anybody’s guess. Here we go!

Ingredients:

  • 2 litres guava nectar
  • water
  • 2- 2lb. packages long grain white rice
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 13 ripe, yellow plantains, peeled and sliced thin like a banana

Directions:

In my rice cooker, one bag of rice is equal to seven measures of rice, which is the maximum. Put that in with 1 litre of guava nectar and the cinnamon & cloves, and fill up to proper level for amount of rice and cook. Then empty it into a large roaster pan and add half the sliced plantains and stir together. prepare the second bag of rice the same way. Mix the two batches of rice together thoroughly. Save out enough plantain to cover the top with one complete layer.  Then cover and bake at 200º for a few hours, until you are ready to go to your event or leave for the park.

Enjoy!



Hot, Sweet Something

I’m going crazy in the kitchen again. I just heard the voice of one of my daughters (or was that all of them?) in my head, saying “make that still.” At any rate, we have had such large crowds lately, that I thought I should make another dish. I had quinoa, but not enough time to go to Produce Junction. Inspiration combined with great sales on the “Ethnic Foods” aisle at Giant when I went to buy the iced tea. Here is the recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups organic quinoa
  • 2 litres mango nectar
  • 1 quart water
  • avocado oil
  • ~ 1 Tablespoon fresh grated ginger root
  • 2 Tablespoons vanilla extract
  • 1 Tablespoon allspice
  • 1 Tablespoon cinnamon
  • 2 cans (40 ounce) yams in syrup

Directions:

In a turkey roasting pan, over two burners, heat a generous amount of avocado oil and toast the six cups of quinoa. Be careful not to burn it.  Have the Mango nectar and the water ready. Add the Mango nectar and the quart of water before the quinoa burns. Stir frequently. Bring the pot to a boil and stir frequently while it simmers for 5 or 6 minutes. This is when you add the ginger, allspice, and cinnamon. Then mix in the vanilla and cover. Turn off the heat and let sit for 15 minutes. Open the cans of yams. Using a sturdy wisk, mash the yams in the cans thoroughly, then spread them over the quinoa in the roaster pan and wisk them into the mixture. Place the roaster in the oven and bake at 200º until you are ready to leave for your event or to serve to the folks in the street.

It is tasty and sweet and nutritious, with protein and fibre and flavonoids and healthy spices.



Not Fried Chinese Rice

This dish by Miss April, took some explaining to our men and women on the street. It is not the prettiest, with the black rice. Once a few tried it and the word spread of how tasty it  was, we had no problem ‘selling’ the rest. This recipe does not use soy sauce, because we do not use soy personally, because it is impossible to get non-GMO and the nutritional effects are questionable. If we would not eat it ourselves, we do not serve it to others. The people truly appreciate this. Many had never heard of black rice. Black rice has more powerful natural antioxidant per spoonful than blueberries. It is a natural anti-inflammatory and helps prevent cancer, heart attacks and Alzheimer’s disease. Sometimes what you don’t know about can help you. It pays to try new things.

  • 5 cups black rice or mahogany rice, cook in 10 cups water
  • 1 lb. carrots, shredded
  • 1 bunch celery , sliced
  • 1 large Napa cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 2 large Spanish onions, finely chopped
  • 1-1/2 heads garlic, minced
  • 1 lb. Shitake mushrooms, stems removed, sliced thin
  • 1 lb. Crimini / baby bella mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 4 Tablespoons coconut aminos (instead of soy sauce)
  • 3 Tablespoons ginger fresh grated
  • salt & pepper
  • olive oil

Saute’ carrots & celery slightly  and transfer to large turkey roasting pan. Saute’ cabbage until wilted, adding coconut aminos and ginger. Transfer to roasting pan. Saute’ onions, garlic and mushrooms, adding salt & pepper, until soft. Stir into pan with other veggies and rice. Cover and keep warm in oven at 200º until ready to leave for the city.




Veggie Topped Mofongo

The Thursday before last, April made this dish for our vegetarian alternative. She wasn’t sure how it would go over, since it is a bit exotic. It is an Afro-Puerto-Rican dish. Of course, she puts her own spin on everything she does. (Where would she get that from? Ahem.) I assured her that enough people had Puerto Rican friends or relatives that they had been exposed to some of this cuisine before. It was very well received. We came home with an empty pan.

Mofongo:

  • 12 large green plantains, peeled, sliced 1/3 inch thick and lightly fried on both sides
  • 2 large root pieces yucca/cassava, peeled, cut in 1″ cubes and boiled until pretty soft
  • 1-1/2 heads garlic, peeled
  • salt and pepper
  • Using a food processor, pulse plantain, yucca, garlic, cooking water, and seasonings in batches. Texture should be like chunk mashed potatoes. Spread in the bottom of a large roasting pan.

Veggies:

  • 8 med-lg onions, sliced
  • 2 lbs carrots, sliced
  • 4 bunches Swiss chard, chopped
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup turmeric
  • Working in batches, sauté  the onions and carrots until barely tender, adding part of the turmeric toward the end of each batch. Stir together with the chard and salt and pepper to taste and spread on top of mofongo in pan. Cover and bake @ 350º for  a couple hours.